Posts tagged “hateoas”


December 7, 2021
  A Tour of myPrayerJournal v3: Conclusion

NOTE: This is the final post in a series; see the introduction for information on requirements and links to other posts in the series.

We’ve gone in depth on several different aspects of this application and the technologies it uses. Now, let’s zoom out and look at some big-picture lessons learned.

What I Liked

Generally speaking, I liked everything. That does not make for a very informative post, though, so here are a few things that worked really well.

Simplification Via htmx

One of the key concepts in a Representational State Transfer (REST) API is that of Hypermedia as the Engine of Application State (HATEOAS). In short, this means that the state of an application is held within the hypermedia that is exchanged between client and server; and, in practice, the server is responsible for altering that state. This is completely different from the JSON API / JavaScript framework model, even if they use GET, POST, PUT, and PATCH properly.

(This is a near over-simplification; the paper that initially proposed these concepts – in much, much more detail – earned its author a doctoral degree.)

The simplicity of this model is great; and, when I say “simplicity,” I am speaking of a lack of complexity, not a naïveté of approach. I was able to remove a large amount of complexity and synchronization from the client/server interactions between myPrayerJournal v2 and v3. State management used to be the most complex part of the application. Now, the most complex part is the HTML rendering; since that is what controls the state, though, this makes sense. I have 25 years of experience writing HTML, and even at its most complex, it simply is not.

LiteDB

This was a very simple application - and, despite its being open for any user with a Google or Microsoft account, I have been the only regular user of the application. LiteDB’s setup was easy, implementation was easy, and it performs really well. I suspect this would be the case with many concurrent users. If the application were to grow, and I find that my suspicion was not borne out by reality, I could create a database file per user, and back up the data directory instead of a specific file. As with htmx, the lack of complexity makes the application easily maintainable.

What I Learned

Throughout this entire series of posts, most of the content would fall under this heading. There are a few things that did not fit into those posts, though.

htmx Support in .NET

I developed Giraffe.Htmx as a part of this effort, and mentioned that I became aware of htmx on an episode of .NET Rocks!. The project I developed is very F#-centric, and uses features of the language that are not exposed in C# or VB.NET. However, there are two packages that work with the standard ASP.NET Core paradigm. Htmx provides server-side support for the htmx request and response headers, similar to Giraffe.Htmx, and Htmx.TagHelpers contains tag helpers for use in Razor, similar to what Giraffe.ViewEngine.Htmx does for Giraffe View Engine. Both are written by Khalid Abuhakmeh, a developer advocate at JetBrains (which generously licensed their tools to this project, and produces the best developer font ever).

While I did not use these projects, I did look at the source, and they look good. Open source libraries go from good to great by people using them, then providing constructive feedback (and pull requests, if you are able).

Write about Your Code

Yes, I’m cheating a bit with this one, as it was one of the takeaways from the v1 tour, but it’s still true. Writing about your code has several benefits:

  • You understand your code more fully.
  • Others can see not just the code you wrote, but understand the thought process behind it.
  • Readers can provide you feedback. (This may not always seem helpful; regardless of its tone, though, thinking through whether the point of their critique is justified can help you learn.)

And, really, knowledge sharing is what makes the open-source ecosystem work. Closed / proprietary projects have their place, but if you do something interesting, write about it!

What Could Be Better

Dove-tailing from the previous section, writing can also help you think through your code; if you try to explain it, and and have trouble, that should serve as a warning that there are improvements to be had. These are the areas where this project has room to get better.

Deferred Features

There were 2 changes I had originally planned for myPrayerJournal v3 that did not get accomplished. One is a new “pray through the requests” view, with a distraction-free next-card-up presentation. The other is that updating requests sends them to the bottom of the list, even if they have not been marked as prayed; this will require calculating a separate “last prayed” date instead of using the “as of” date from the latest history entry.

The migration introduced a third deferred change. When v1/v2 ran in the browser, the dates and times were displayed in the user’s local timezone. With the HTML being generated on the server, though, dates and times are now displayed in UTC. The purpose of the application is to focus the user’s attention on their prayer requests, not to make them have to do timezone math in their head! htmx has an hx-headers attribute that specifies headers to pass along with the request; I plan to use a JavaScript call to set a header on the body tag when a full page loads (hx-headers is inherited), then use that timezone to adjust it back to the user’s current timezone.

That LiteDB Mapping

I did a good bit of tap-dancing in the LiteDB data model and mapping descriptions, mildly defending the design decisions I had made there. The recurrence should be designed differently, and there should be individual type mappings rather than mapping the entire document. Yes, it worked for my purpose, and this project was more about Vue to htmx than ensuring a complete F#-to-LiteDB mapping of domain types. As I implement the features above, though, I believe I will end up fixing those issues as well.


Thank you for joining me on this tour; I hope it has been enjoyable, and maybe even educational.

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